Tennis Elbow: What is it and How to treat it.

Post 97: Tennis Elbow (1/3): Diagnosis – Tennis elbow, or Lateral Tendinopathy, is one of the most common issues arising at the elbow as it affects up to 3% of the general population each year. – However, it is important to receive a proper diagnosis as not all pain located at the outer part of the arm is tennis elbow. Let's look at five common ways to help determine a true diagnosis of tennis elbow: 1️⃣ Painful gripping, with or without maximal exertion. 2️⃣ Pain to touch or pressure within 1 centimeter of the lateral epicondyle (oftentimes the extensor carpi radialis brevis) 3️⃣ Pain when resisting 3rd finger extension 4️⃣ Pain when resisting wrist extension and radial deviation with a straight or bent elbow. 5️⃣ Pain when stretching the wrist extensors and finger extensors with a straight arm. – If you have pain with most of these tests, it's possible that you have "tennis elbow". If you're experiencing numbness, tingling, or weakness in the forearm or hand, nerve involvement may be more likely. – Follow along as the next two posts will teach you how to get rid of your pain for good!

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Post 98: Tennis Elbow (2/3): Calm Sh!t Down – I want to start by saying that none of the movements in the video are inherently bad. However, tennis elbow is generally considered an injury caused by gradual overuse. In order to calm sh!t down (via @greglehman), it's important to temporarily modify aggravating activities. Let's break down some movements that may be causing you discomfort and how you can implement modifications to improve your symptoms: 1️⃣ Push ups or pressing movements – if you have pain when your wrists are in an extended or flexed position, change your grip so your wrists stay neutral. 2️⃣ Pull ups or pulling movements – that pronated grip might be making your pain worse so give neutral or supinated a try. 3️⃣ Typing – people who adopt non neutral wrist positions at work generally have a poorer prognosis. Try placing a rolled up towel under your wrists to keep them level. 4️⃣ Texting – how do you normally text or use your phone? Does it cause pain? If not, don't worry about it. If so, change it up. 5️⃣ Gripping/lifting – if you continue to have pain when you're rowing, deadlifting, etc., try using lifting straps to give your forearms a break while you focus on truly pulling with your back musculature. – Comment below and tag someone who has been dealing with tennis elbow! The next post will show you how to Build Sh!t Back Up! See it first by following @basicmvmtpt

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Post 99: Tennis Elbow (3/3): Build Sh!t Back Up – After you've calmed sh!t down (see last post), it's time to build it back up! – Since tennis elbow is an overuse injury, you need to select the appropriate exercises to induce positive physiological adaptations so your body has the resiliency to withstand the stressors of lifting and daily activities. In order to do that, I'm going to break up this post into three sections: 1️⃣ Introduction: one of the best ways to reintroduce load to a painful region is through the use of isometrics as they can reduce pain, improve strength, and create positive nervous system changes. Pick a grip that works best for you and try squeezing an object for 30-60 seconds, 5 times per day. The goal is to keep the movement pain free, but slowly generate more tension as your tolerance to the movement improves. 2️⃣ Isolation: while incorporating the full body is important, it's also important to positively stress the localized tissue using controlled movements through heavy, slow resistance. Try performing this resisted wrist extension with your arm supported and elbow bent three times per week. You want to pick a weight that sufficiently challenges you for 3 sets of 15, but doesn't cause more pain than a 3/10. When the movement becomes easier and simultaneously less painful, it's time to bump up the weight. Treating tennis elbow is a marathon, not a sprint, so start light and progress gradually. 3️⃣ Integration: it is well documented that individuals with tennis elbow can also have issues with their shoulder, thoracic spine, neck, and even their nervous system! There is also a correlation between grip strength and shoulder function! Use the kettlebell exercises in the video or similar variations to initially challenge the elbow isometrically, while also building strength, resiliency, and proper movement patterns in the rest of the trunk and upper body. – Hope everyone liked this series! Tag someone who might benefit from this and comment below if you have any other thoughts! – Thanks @basicmvmtpt for the feature!

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